Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Independently Remembering Those That Served 1775 - 1783




Old Pine Street church is the only Colonial Presbyterian church in Philadelphia still on its original foundation. Many of the founding church members played a significant role in the establishment of the country, and notable pastors and church Elders were active patriots during the Revolutionary War. During the war, the church was occupied by the British, as a hospital and then a horse stable. The British demolished the church interior, using wood as a fuel source. Notable early pastors and members include: The Rev. John Blair Smith (1791), also President of Union College of Schenectady, NY, was one of the first victims of the 1799 Yellow Fever epidemic. Rev. George Duffield, 2nd pastor after Rev. Samuel Aiken (chaplain to the continental Congress), was an active patriot during the Revolutionary war. Duffield provided leadership during the Revolution during the stamp Act and against the king’s unconstitutional taxation; Duffield proclaimed “to arms, to arms” and argued for liberty. John Adams (2nd President, Signer of the Declaration of Independence) and other patriots of the First congress attended Old Pine under Rev. Duffield. By 1905, there were 158 Colonial Presbyterian churches remaining in Pennsylvania. The church cemetery remains as one of the only remaining colonial churchyards in Philadelphia and New York City (Gibbons, 1905). (Description of Old Pine Street Church found at the Library of Congress website)


John Thompson 1733 - 1810




Captain Paul Cox 1748 - 1832



Nathan Boys 1740- 1808








James Campbell 1757 - 1817


James McConnell 1767 - 1799


William Hurrie 1721 - 1781



Captain John McGinley 1751 - 1835



George Dawson 1760 - 1832
only known Tory buried in the graveyard.






James Milligan,Gentleman and Esquire, Auditor died 1818







Jared Ingersoll
There is a lot of information online about this gentleman. I chose Wikipedia because it has a sketch.




There is a lot of information online about this gentleman. I chose Wikipedia because it has a copy of his portrait, a Charles Wilson Peale.


















If you are looking for someone to thank for your freedom today, you might as well start at the beginning. These souls are resting in peace all around us and the PASSAR has a great website that lists where you can find them.

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