Friday, November 28, 2014

Top 10 Places to Recognize Native Americans

Great Minquas Path  went from the Susquehanna River to what is now Philadelphia, on the Schuylkill River.

1. Lancaster County (link) to a description of this location in Gap, PA on Route 30 between 897 and 41.

2. Chester County (pictured) located at Route 322 (High Street) and Church Avenue in West Chester






3. Delaware County (pictured) Rose Valley Road and Traymore Road in the borough of Rose Valley near Hedgerow and he Old Mill.




4. Philadelphia (link) to a description of this location Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Island Avenue, on the right when traveling west on Main Street.


5. The Point of View bronze sculpture by James A. West, located on the Grand View Scenic Byway looks over the Three Rivers that connect in Pittsburgh. It.represents the meeting between George Washington and Seneca leader Guyasuta, once allies, then veterans on opposing side in the French and Indian War.





6. Ghost in the Head is a Native American re-enactor that I saw in July in Monroeville, PA. He travels around to educated people on the customs of the Huron Indians. He talked about face paint and jewelry and the pouch that Indians travel with, their chi. 



He built the traditional dome shaped wigwam Indian shelter on a frame of tree branches covered with the leaves of cattails.



7. Trail of the Whispering Giants statue can be found in Ocean City, Maryland down by the big boardwalk parking lot. The monument was carved from a 100 year old oak. The monument was a gift from Peter Toth to Maryland and represent the Assateague Indian. The Assateagues were a sub-tribe of the Nanticokes both spoke a dialect of the Lenapes or Delaware Indian. Toth has over 70 monuments and plans to have one in every state to pay homage to raise the nation's consciousness as to the plight of Native Americans. Here is a link to some of his other carvings. Pennsylvania has two of his works, one in Sharon, PA and Williamsport, PA. 




8. An Indian Monument in Tuckerton, NJ was moved here from its original location in Camdem.  This blogger link bassriverhistory.blogspot.com has a more complete explanation of the statue. 

IN MEMORY OF OUR BROTHERS
WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE
IN THE WORLD WAR  1917-1919
MEMORIAL TO ALL MEMBERS
IMPROVED ORDER OF REDMEN
GREAT COUNCIL OF NEW JERSEY
DEDICATED OCTOBER 13, 1920
CAMDEN, N.J.
REDEDICATED MAY 21, 1981
TUCKERTON, N.J.





9. This newspaper clipping of Geronimo is part of the Christian Sanderson collection at the Sanderson Museum located at 1755 Creek Road, in Chadds Ford.  Chris made a note that he actually saw this noted Indian twice at the St. Louis World's Fair and Teddy Roosevelt's Inauguration.  Also in the collection you can see the signature of Sitting Bull 3 weeks before he was killed.  The Sanderson Museum has many amazing artifacts.





10. Lewis and Clark led the Corp of Discovery on an Expedition funded by Thomas Jefferson to find the Northwest passage to the Pacific Ocean. It was a successful journey even though they discovered there was no true waterway connection. It would not have been possible without the help of Native Americans along the way and Sakakawea, a Shoshone Indian woman played an integral part in this accomplishment.  A statue of Sakakawea is located in the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center.

Photo courtesy of Architect of The Capitol

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Top 10 Things to Learn from William Penn and Native Americans about Peace

1. The Penn Treaty tradition holds, took place between William Penn, a Quaker and Tamanend, a chief of one of the clans that made up the Lenni-Lenape nation in the Delaware Valley. Tamanend is holding the Wampum Belt. This diorama can be found at Arch Street Friends Meeting in Philadelphia, PA.



2. Penn was fond of his Indian neighbors and they returned the compliment. He treated them as equals and they were as welcome in the rich halls of Pennsbury as any of his other guests.  The Lenape were constantly amazed by the Governor's vigor and strength during exploration trips he sometimes made along the Delaware River and its tributaries. (Illustrations and descriptions are from Pennsbury Manor, William Penn's home).



3. The Delaware Indians were Algonquins.  Their name, Lenni-Lenape meant "real men" or "native men". They loved the rich land along the river and the men hunted the forests, the women tilled the fertile soil and the children played along the banks of the beautiful river.  These are Lenape sites along the river. The present site of Trenton would be just above the top of the map, Philadelphia just below the bottom frame.  We are showing Indian site surrounding Pennsbury Manor in lower Bucks County. (Illustrations and descriptions are from Pennsbury Manor).



4. Penn Treaty Park located at Columbia and Beach Streets in Philadelphia is believed to be the location where the treaty took place under the Great Elm Tree between William Penn and area Native Americans.



5. THE GREAT ELM OF SHACKMAXON IS THE SITE UNDER WHICH PENN AND THE DELAWARE INDIANS MADE THE GREAT TREATY IN 1682. SINCE THAT TIME LEGEND AND HISTORY OF THE EVENT HAVE GENERATED ADMIRATION FOR WILLIAM PENN AND THE TREE. THE TREE BECAME THE LIVING SYMBOL OF THE GREAT TREATY DURING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR, BRITISH GENERAL SIMCOE POSTED GUARDS AROUND THE TREE TO PROTECT IT FROM THE SETTLERS SEEKING FIREWOOD. WHEN THE ELM WAS BLOWN DOWN BY A STORM ON 3 MARCH 1810, IT WAS 283 YEARS OLD, EIGHT FEET IN DIAMETER, AND TWENTY-FOUR CIRCUMFERENCE. THE NEXT DAY, HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE GATHERED TO MARVEL AT AND TAKE CUTTINGS FROM THE ANCIENT TREE. PART OF TE TREE WAS MADE INTO A CHAIR FOR BENJAMIN RUSH, A SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. TODAY THERE ARE SECOND, THIRD AND FOURTH GENERATION CUTTINGS OF THE ELM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, PENNSYLVANIA HOSPITAL, HAVERFORD COLLEGE AND THE PENN TREATY PARK.




Great great grandchild of the original peace elm under which the peace treaty was made in 1682. Dedicated May 6, 2010. Given by THE FRIENDS OF PENN TREATY PARK.




6. THE PENN SOCIETY OBELISK ON 19 SEPTEMBER 1825, A REPORT ON THE LOCATION OF PENN'S GREAT TREATY WAS READ BY ROBERTS VAUX, VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE COUNCIL OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA.  IT WAS VAUX'S SUGGESTION THAT THIS SOCIETY SHOULD PLAN AN "OBELISK OF GRANITE', WITH THE APPROPRIATE INSCRIPTIONS, AT THE TRADITIONAL SPOT OF THE TREATY WHERE THE GREAT EM AD ONCE STOOD AT SHACKAMAXON.  THE OBELISK WAS ERECTED BY THE PENN SOCIETY IN 1827 AND IS THE EARLIEST PUBLIC MONUMENT IN PHILADELPHIA.  OVER THE YEARS THERE HAS BEEN DEBATE ABOUT WHETHER OR NOT THE OBELISK ACTUALLY MARKS THE SPOT OF THE GREAT ELM. IT WAS THIS DEBATE INITIATED THE MOVEMENT TO MAKE A HISTORIC SITE OF THE LAND SURROUNDING THE OBELISK.  THUS THE NOTION OF PENN TREATY PARK WAS BORN.


The Four Sides of the Obelisk are inscribed with these words:

Treaty ground of William Penn, and the Indian Nations, 1682, Unbroken faith.
William Penn, Born 1644, Died 1713.
Pennsylvania, Founded, 1681, by Deeds of Peace.
Placed by the Penn Society, A.D. 1827, to mark the site of the Great Elm Tree.


7. THE GREAT TREATY THERE HAS BEEN MUCH DEBATE OVER THE EXACT DETAILS OF PENN'S DEALINGS WITH THE INDIANS OF THE DELAWARE RIVER VALLEY. IT IS WRITTEN THAT PENN DEALT FAIRLY WITH ALL THE INDIANS AND SETTLERS THAT HE ENCOUNTERED, IT IS TRUE THAT THE GREAT TREATY, ID IT ACTUALLY DID OCCUR, WAS ONE OF THE MANY TREATIES THAT PENN MADE WITH THE INDIANS.  MAKING TREATIES WITH THE AREA INDIANS WAS A PRACTICE THAT WENT ON IN OTHER SETTLEMENTS AS WELL. HOWEVER, PENN'S TREATMENT OF THE INDIANS WAS CONSISTENTLY FAIR AND EQUAL. THIS THEME OF EQUALITY WAS NOTICED IN EUROPE AND CREATED A NEW INTEREST IN THE COLONIES AND GREAT RESPECT FOR PENN. VOLTAIRE EVEN SPOKE OF THE TREATY AS ONE THAT WAS "NEVER SWORN TO AND NEVER BROKEN'. IT ALSO PROVIDED THE INSPIRATION FOR A NUMBER OF ARTISTIC REPRESENTATIONS OF THE TREATY, THE MOST FAMOUS BEING THE ONE DONE BY BENJAMIN WEST. TODAY WE CAN SEE THE ONE ARTIFACT OF PENN'S AMITY - THE WAMPUM BELT GIVEN TO PENN BY THE INDIANS - ON DISPLAY AT THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA.


8. PENN TREATY PARK : A PLACE OF PEACE THE SUBJECT OF THE GREAT TREATY HAS ALWAYS HELD A SPECIAL PLACE IN THE HEARTS AND MINDS OF PENNSYLVANIANS, ESPECIALLY THOSE N THE AREA SURROUNDING THE LEGENDARY SITE. WHEN THE GREAT ELM BLEW DOWN IN 1810, THE LAND UPON WHERE THE GREAT TREATY WAS MADE HAD NO MARKERS OF THE EVENT. THE PENN SOCIETY ERECTED AN OBELISK TO MARK THE SPOT OF THE TREE IN 1827. LATER THE LAND WAS APPROPRIATED FOR PUBLIC USE AND A PRESERVATION LANDMARK. MEMBERS OF THE KENSINGTON COMMUNITY SOUGHT TO HAVE THE AREA DEDICATED AS A PARK, THE DEDICATION CEREMONY TOOK PLACE ON 28 OCTOBER 1893. SINCE THEN THE COMMUNITY HAS PROMOTED PROPER CARE OF THE PARK. THE PARK CHANGED HANDS TWICE BEFORE BECOMING PART OF THE FAIRMOUNT PARK SYSTEM IN 1954.  IN 1987, THE COMMUNITY CAME TOGETHER ONCE AGAIN TO FULFILL THEIR DREAMS FOR THE  PARK AND MAKE IT A BEAUTIFUL PLACE TO ENJOY THE PEACE PENN MADE THERE OVER300 YEARS AGO.




9. Bob Haozous, a Native American artist's steel sculpture "Moon Over Indian Land" located on a tract of land across from Penn Treaty Park depicts two figures from the original Wampum Belt along with cutouts of airplanes and clouds which could also be interpreted as birds and peace pipe clouds weaving the past with present. Haozous is a the son of famous Native American artist Allan Capron Houser  (June 30, 1914—August 22,  1994) a Chiricahua Apache, was an outstanding Modernist sculptor of the 20th century. He was the grand-nephew of  Geronimo.


Wampum Belt on display at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.


10. A statue of Tamanend stands at Front and Market Streets in Philadelphia just as you enter Interstate 95. The statue created by Raymond Sandoval, a graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Tamanend was dedicated in 1995  "Tamanend was considered the patron saint of America by the colonists prior to American Independence."



Also of interest: Friends of Tamanend Park website.

November is National Native American Month.

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Top 10 Thanksgiving Cornucopia

Turkey

Mashed Potatoes

Gravy

Stuffing

Corn

Green Bean Casserole

Cranberry Sauce

Pumpkin Pie

Rolls

Beverage of choice

Reduce food waste. As we enter the holiday season remember to feed people – not landfills.  1 in 6 Americans lacks food security. Donate your extra food to your local food bank and prevent waste by being smart about what you buy, how you prep, and how you store your food.  And, if you do end up with some scraps, compost them.
http://www2.epa.gov/recycle/reducing-wasted-food-basics

Monday, November 24, 2014

Top 10 Upcoming Events This Thankful Week

November 27 Frost Bite Run 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Southeastern PA Antique Car Club Rally at the Thomas Massey House in Broomall.

November 27 6ABC and Dunkin Donuts 95th Annual Thanksgiving Day Parade, 8:30 a.m - 12 p.m. Watch and Win prizes like Dunkin Donuts Coffee for a year, Ten Eagles tickets plus a Dunkin Donuts tailgate for the 12/14 game and a Family Florida Trip to Tradewind Island Resort check the website for details and watch the parade for the "secret words". If you plan on attending, the parade starts at 20th and JFK Boulevard. It proceeds east on JFK to 16th Stf yreet, turns left onto 16th Street to Arch Street, left on Arch Street to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The Parade will then move up the Parkway, then left around Logan Circle. It will end after passing in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. November 27  Love Park Christmas Village opens through December 28.

November 27 E A G L E S Eagles vs Dallas 4:30 p.em. on Fox at Dallas.  Plan you meals accordingly. Football and Food it doesn't get any better than this for some.

November 27 through January 11,2015 at Longwood Gardens A Longwood Christmas. Check the website for details on all the beauty that awaits you.

Nov. 28 Santa’s Arrival and Festival of Lights Media Courthouse on Front St.,
entertainment from Makin' Music begins at 5 p.m. with a special guest before Santa's grand entrance at 6pm on a Media Fire Company fire truck.

November 28 Macy's Light Show Santaland an Dickens Village

November 28 Laurel Hill Cemetery Monthly FOURTH FRIDAY TOUR SERIES: HOT SPOTS and STORIED PLOTS November’s walking tour will take place on Friday,  departing from Laurel Hill Cemetery’s Gatehouse entrance at 3822 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19132. Free parking is located in the lot across the street from the Gatehouse. In life and in death, we all have stories to tell. Join Laurel Hill Cemetery for an informative overview of Laurel Hill’s long and colorful history, which will include many of the marble masterpieces, stunning views and legendary stories that afford the cemetery its WOW factor. This is the perfect tour for first-time visitors to Laurel Hill, and anyone else who enjoys beautiful art, scenic nature and fascinating history. “Hot Spots and Storied Plots” will be presented monthly as part of Laurel Hill Cemetery’s Fourth Friday tour series, which take place on the fourth Friday of every month at 10:00am. The cost is $8/person general admission. Tickets can be purchased at the door, or in advance by phone (215) 228-8200 or online.Guide: Pattye Stringer. I have done this tour before, it was advertized to walk off that turkey dinner.  It is a great tour!

November 30 Santa State Street Fun Run and Walk and Parade in Media PA. 3:30 p.m. is the Fun Run and Walk and 4 p.m. the Parade.

November 30 online registration ends for Ridley United Soccer Club Mud, Sweat and Cheers 3K and 5K Blackrock Park, Ridley Township. Check out Facebook updates.

November 30 The German Society of Philadelphia Alpine Christmas Music singalong 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at 611 Spring Garden Street in Philadelphia. Check link for tickets.

Give Thanks